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Coronavirus update – Wednesday 18 March 2020

Due to recent government advice to work from home, our office is closed until further notice. Our helpdesk line has been redirected and will be extremely busy. We ask that you contact us by completing our online referral form.

Always call 999 if it's an emergency or you're in immediate danger.

What is domestic abuse?

Domestic abuse is defined by the Home Office as ‘Any incident or pattern of incidents of controlling, coercive, threatening behaviour, violence, or abuse between those aged 16 or over who are, or who have been, intimate partners or family members regardless of gender or sexuality.'

The abuse can encompass, but is not limited to:

  • Psychological abuse
  • Physical abuse
  • Sexual abuse
  • Financial abuse
  • Emotional abuse

Domestic abuse could happen to anyone. It is never acceptable and is definitely not healthy. Abuse does not always mean being hit, it also includes sexual abuse and bullying.

If you are feeling intimidated by a partner (or ex-partner or family member), or they have made you feel frightened, then you may be experiencing domestic abuse.

Domestic abuse is not always carried out by a partner, it could be an ex-partner or a family member. It also includes forced marriage and female genital mutilation.

It can happen to people who identify as straight, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender. Your sexuality does not make you more or less likely to experience domestic abuse.

Find out more about types of domestic abuse
1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men will experience domestic abuse in their lifetimes