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Coronavirus update – Wednesday 18 March 2020

Due to recent government advice to work from home, our office is closed until further notice. Our helpdesk line has been redirected and will be extremely busy. We ask that you contact us by completing our online referral form.

Always call 999 if it's an emergency or you're in immediate danger.

Types of abuse

Domestic abuse can be perpetrated in many different ways. These actions fall into the categories of physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, psychological abuse, and financial abuse.

Examples of abusive behaviour

Physical

  • Spitting
  • Grabbing/pushing/pinching/slapping/punching
  • Hair pulling/cutting
  • Urinating on you
  • Burning
  • Branding
  • Choking/strangulation/attempts to drown
  • False imprisonment
  • Forced use of drugs and alcohol

Sexual

  • Rape
  • Filming sex without consent
  • Unwanted touching
  • Withholding sex
  • Being forced to watch porn
  • Penetration with objects without your consent
  • Bestiality
  • Being passed to others for sex without your consent

Emotional and Psychological

  • Threats of suicide to make you feel guilty
  • Name calling
  • Putting you down
  • Making you feel useless and worthless
  • Blackmail
  • Forced marriage

Financial

  • Taking your money
  • Bribing you
  • Preventing you from earning money
  • Forcing you to work more than you want to
  • Forcing you to steal

This list is not exhaustive.

You do not have to be experiencing all of these categories, the behaviours are different in every situation and can change over time.

If you are experiencing any of these, or any other form of abuse, then please contact us for practical local support. We can help you and your children stay safe in your own home, support you to access specialist legal advice, help you with other agencies (eg Benefits and Housing), and, if you cannot stay at home, we can help you find a Place of Safety.
1 in 7 children will have lived with domestic abuse

Coercive control

Coercively controlling behaviour was officially criminalised on 29 December 2015. This means that perpetrators who are attempting to control and emotionally, financially, and psychologically abuse their (ex)partners/family members could face criminal charges for their actions.

Coercive control is defined as ‘A course of conduct in which a pattern of violence, sexual coercion, intimidation, isolation and control are used to dominate and exploit a partner and deprive her of her basic rights and resources’ (Evan Stark 2007).

This can include, but is not limited to:

  • Stalking
  • Not allowing you to leave your property
  • Telling you what to wear
  • Preventing you from going to work
  • Controlling your finances
  • Threats
  • Putting you down (name calling etc).

If you feel that you, or someone you know or who you are working with, are being coercively controlled, please call our helpdesk on 01452 726 570 and they will discuss your options with you.
Victims aged 61+ are much more likely to experience abuse from an adult family member or current partner